Introducing The Garden of Sorrows

NGV Theatre Panel Discussion E-FLYER[1]

Snuff Puppets will be talking collaboration, inspiration and transformations at NGV Australia. The Garden of Sorrows is our new work in development and an exciting new collaboration we are embarking on with writer, John Hughes, and artist, Marco Luccio.

At The Author, the Artist & the Puppeteer, our very own Andy Freer will discuss the journey of adapting Hughes’ mesmerising collection of fables that explore the animal origins of human traits. The panel discussion will explore the process of cross-disciplinary collaboration that emerges through the interpretation of Marco Luccio’s exquisite etchings and Hughes’ words into Snuff Puppets.

Facilitated by Raymond Gill, Managing Editor of The Daily Review and previous Arts Editor of The Age.

Thursday 3 December 6pm to 8pm
Visit the NGV website for bookings or phone: 03 8662 1555
$35 NGV Members $42 General Admission


Welcome to Snuff Skool

Hong Kong WorkshopA unique chance to shed your everyday self and become a Snuff Puppet!

Join us in our Footscray home, the Drill Hall, and learn the Snuff way: improvisational, spontaneous and always with the freedom to play. If you’re a hardcore Snuff-phile this is your chance to get into a Snuff Puppet and venture out in to the world, creating your own Snuff brand of puppet/audience collisions. Find out more about Snuff Skool.

Snuff Puppets’ Snuff Skool is proud to be a part of Big West Festival 2015 – the leading community-based, contemporary arts festival in Melbourne’s West.

Saturday 21 & 28 November 9am to 5pm
The Drill Hall, 395 Barkly St, Footscray, 3011

$35 Full $25 Concession For ages 14+

Tickets include a full-day workshop, catered lunch from Plough Hotel and participation in a street roaming performance.

Add me to the waiting list

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Love Your MAMA

Congratulations Albury on your beautiful new MAMA. We had a fantastic Big Night Out celebrating with you.


Butcher Needs a Lift

Butcher wants to hitch his way to Albury to see MAMA. Will you stop for him? 

If he can make it to Albury, he’ll be joined by his Cow friends and the Human Body Parts.


MAMA’s Big Night Out

MAMA Albury bannerWe’re headed to Albury soon for the huge opening celebration party of MAMA Albury’s new art museum.

MAMA’s Big Night Out is being co-ordinated by Artistic Director, Elizabeth Walsh, “It’s more than a street party, it will be like a choreographed event in the square. If people are expecting balloons and sausage sizzles they’ll be disappointed, it’s going to be much more.”

Our Human Body Parts and Cows will be part of the fun and they sure are ready to party! We’re performing Friday 2 October and Saturday 3 OCtober.

A Note from Nick: Typhoons, Super-Keen Cucumber Wranglers, and a Chanting Circle

Part Three of Nick Wilson‘s Japan diary:

The final stage of our Japan trip was a week-long visit to Honjima Island, to exhibit puppets, meet the community, run some workshops, make some guest appearances on the mainland, and to present a feature performance in the island’s disused Kabuki theatre.

While statistically the communities of Urada and Honjima might look similar in some ways, we all felt a definite shift in the atmosphere on moving from Urada’s endless green mountains and rice-fields to this small-island fishing village on the Seto Inland Sea. During the ferry trip across, Japan’s longest bridge appeared to neither start nor end, but to bypass the island and disappear in ocean mist on its way somewhere else. Parts of the island are quite visibly abandoned, neglected and overgrown: weeds grow through cracked concrete, and the salty air turns metal fixtures into flaky brown rust before their time. Honjima’s population has fallen from 4000 in the 1960’s to 400 today, of which only 20 are school-aged children. It is one of 12 islands that are host to the region’s Setouchi Art Triennale, another ambitious and immense project by Fram Kitagawa to revitalise dwindling regions through the arts.

Our venue was Chito Tse-za, a beachside Kabuki theatre dated to 1862, and barely opened in the last thirty years. A fine example of the smart simplicity of traditional Japanese construction, the front panels slide open to either side of the building, and the waist-high rails fold outward to form an extension of the stage, which the audience views from outside in a public courtyard. We were instantly charmed by its elegant design, skilful construction and dilapidated ambience. It seemed an ideal gateway into that parallel, slightly surreal world that our puppets often inhabit: where the impossible and the dreamlike can invade mundane streets; where the fictional ‘puppet world’ shares an open boundary with the lives of our audience.

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